Posts Tagged ‘HOME INVASION’

Sunday, April 22nd, 2012

21 Things Your Burglar Won’t Tell You…

1.Of course I look familiar. I was here just last week cleaning your carpets, painting your shutters, or delivering your new refrigerator.
2.Hey, thanks for letting me use the bathroom when I was working in your yard last week. While I was in there, I unlatched the back window to make my return a little easier.
3.Love those flowers. That tells me you have taste… And taste means there are nice things inside. Those yard toys your kids leave out always make me wonder what type of gaming system they have.
4.Yes, I really do look for newspapers piled up on the driveway. And I might leave a pizza flyer in your front door to see how long it takes you to remove it..
5.If it snows while you’re out of town, get a neighbor to create car and foot tracks into the house. Virgin drifts in the driveway are a dead giveaway.
6.If decorative glass is part of your front entrance, don’t let your alarm company install the control pad where I can see if it’s set. That makes it too easy.
7.A good security company alarms the window over the sink. And the windows on the second floor, which often access the master bedroom – and your jewelry. It’s not a bad idea to put motion detectors up there too.
8.It’s raining, you’re fumbling with your umbrella, and you forget to lock your door – understandable. But understand this: I don’t take a day off because of bad weather.
9.I always knock first. If you answer, I’ll ask for directions somewhere or offer to clean your gutters. (Don’t take me up on it.)
10.Do you really think I won’t look in your sock drawer? I always check dresser drawers, the bedside table, and the medicine cabinet.
11.Here’s a helpful hint: I almost never go into kids’ rooms.
12.You’re right: I won’t have enough time to break into that safe where you keep your valuables. But if it’s not bolted down, I’ll take it with me.
13.A loud TV or radio can be a Good deterrent.
14.Sometimes, I carry a clipboard. Sometimes, I dress like a lawn guy and carry a rake. I do my best to never, ever look like a crook.
15.The two things I hate most: loud dogs and nosy neighbors.
16.I’ll break a window to get in, even if it makes a little noise. If your neighbor hears one loud sound, he’ll stop what he’s doing and wait to hear it again. If he doesn’t hear it again, he’ll just go back to what he was doing. It’s human nature.
17.I’m not complaining, but why would you pay all that money for a fancy alarm system and leave your house without setting it?
18.I love looking in your windows. I’m looking for signs that you’re home, and for flat screen TVs or gaming systems I’d like. I’ ll drive or walk through your neighborhood at night, before you close the blinds, just to pick my targets.
19.Avoid announcing your vacation on your Facebook page. It’s easier than you think to look up your address. Parents: caution your kids about this. You see this every day.
20.To you, leaving that window open just a crack during the day is a way to let in a little fresh air. To me, it’s an invitation.
21.If you don’t answer when I knock, I try the door. Occasionally, I hit the jackpot and walk right in.
22. AN ALARM INSTALLED BY SECURE OPERATIONS, SCARES THE CRAP OUT OF ME!! SO CALL THEM FOR A FREE ESTIMATE (631) 473-1085 :

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Self-Defense

Monday, January 31st, 2011

You’ve seen it in movies: A girl walks through an isolated parking garage. Suddenly, an evil-looking guy jumps out from behind an SUV. Girl jabs bad guy in the eyes with her keys — or maybe she kicks him in a certain sensitive place. Either way, while he’s squirming, she leaps into her car and speeds to safety.

That’s the movies. Here’s the real-life action replay: When the girl goes to jab or kick the guy, he knows what’s coming and grabs her arm (or leg), pulling her off balance. Enraged by her attempt to fight back, he flips her onto the ground. Now she’s in a bad place to defend herself — and she can’t run away.

Many people think of self-defense as a karate kick to the groin or jab in the eyes of an attacker. But self-defense actually means doing everything possible to avoid fighting someone who threatens or attacks you. Self-defense is all about using your smarts — not your fists.

Use Your Head

People (guys as well as girls) who are threatened and fight back "in self-defense" actually risk making a situation worse. The attacker, who is already edgy and pumped up on adrenaline — and who knows what else — may become even more angry and violent. The best way to handle any attack or threat of attack is to try to get away. This way, you’re least likely to be injured.

One way to avoid a potential attack before it happens is to trust your instincts. Your intuition, combined with your common sense, can help get you out of trouble. For example, if you’re running alone on the school track and you suddenly feel like you’re being watched, that could be your intuition telling you something. Your common sense would then tell you that it’s a good idea to get back to where there are more people around.

De-Escalating a Bad Situation

Attackers aren’t always strangers who jump out of dark alleys. Sadly, teens can be attacked by people they know. That’s where another important self-defense skill comes into play. This skill is something self-defense experts and negotiators call de-escalation.

De-escalating a situation means speaking or acting in a way that can prevent things from getting worse. The classic example of de-escalation is giving a robber your money rather than trying to fight or run. But de-escalation can work in other ways, too. For example, if someone harasses you when there’s no one else around, you can de-escalate things by agreeing with him or her. You don’t have to actually believe the taunts, of course, you’re just using words to get you out of a tight spot. Then you can redirect the bully’s focus ("Oops, I just heard the bell for third period"), and calmly walk away from the situation.

Something as simple as not losing your temper can de-escalate a situation. Learn how to manage your own anger effectively so that you can talk or walk away without using your fists or weapons.

Although de-escalation won’t always work, it can only help matters if you remain calm and don’t give the would-be attacker any extra ammunition. Whether it’s a stranger or someone you thought you could trust, saying and doing things that don’t threaten your attacker can give you some control.

Reduce Your Risks

Another part of self-defense is doing things that can help you stay safe. Here are some tips from the National Crime Prevention Council and other experts:

  • Understand your surroundings. Walk or hang out in areas that are open, well lit, and well traveled. Become familiar with the buildings, parking lots, parks, and other places you walk. Pay particular attention to places where someone could hide — such as stairways and bushes.
  • Avoid shortcuts that take you through isolated areas.
  • If you’re going out at night, travel in a group.
  • Make sure your friends and parents know your daily schedule (classes, sports practice, club meetings, etc.). If you go on a date or with friends for an after-game snack, let someone know where you’re going and when you expect to return.
  • Check out hangouts. Do they look safe? Are you comfortable being there? Ask yourself if the people around you seem to share your views on fun activities — if you think they’re being reckless, move on.
  • Be sure your body language shows a sense of confidence. Look like you know where you’re going and act alert.
  • When riding on public transportation, sit near the driver and stay awake. Attackers are looking for vulnerable targets.
  • Carry a cell phone if possible. Make sure it’s programmed with your parents’ phone number.
  • Be willing to report crimes in your neighborhood and school to the police.
  • Take a Self-Defense Class- www.umac-mma.com

    The best way — in fact the only way — to prepare yourself to fight off an attacker is to take a self-defense class. We’d love to give you all the right moves in an article, but some things you just have to learn in person.

    A good self-defense class can teach you how to size up a situation and decide what you should do. Self-defense classes can also teach special techniques for breaking an attacker’s grasp and other things you can do to get away. For example, attackers usually anticipate how their victim might react — that kick to the groin or jab to the eyes, for instance. A good self-defense class can teach you ways to surprise your attacker and catch him or her off guard.

    One of the best things people take away from self-defense classes is self-confidence. The last thing you want to be thinking about during an attack is, "Can I really pull this self-defense tactic off?" It’s much easier to take action in an emergency if you’ve already had a few dry runs.

    A self-defense class should give you a chance to practice your moves. If you take a class with a friend, you can continue practicing on each other to keep the moves fresh in your mind long after the class is over.

    Check out your local YMCA, community hospital, or community center for classes. If they don’t have them, they may be able to tell you who does. Your PE teacher or school counselor may also be a great resource. www.umac-mma.com

    www.secureoperations.com

Masked intruders terrorize Eastport couple

Saturday, January 8th, 2011

 

Masked intruders terrorize Eastport couple

Heavily-armed Suffolk County police emergency service officers at

Photo credit: James Carbone | Heavily-armed Suffolk County police emergency service officers at home where suspects were believed held-up at 46 Union Avenue in Eastport. (Jan. 7, 2011)

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Armed Suffolk County police emergency service officers outside Eastport couple terrorized by intruders

Two masked men terrorized an Eastport couple Friday, binding them with duct tape and plastic ties and ransacking their house, police said, in a home invasion with echoes of a notorious Connecticut case.

The assailants – one armed with a small black handgun – then ordered the 38-year-old husband to go get more cash or his wife, 37, would be harmed, according to police. The husband drove alone to a Chase bank in Center Moriches, withdrawing an unknown sum from his account, but his demeanor caused an employee to call 911, police said.

Police descended on the bank just as the man was leaving with his cash withdrawal, and the husband told the responding officers about the invasion, authorities said.

Believing there was a hostage situation, Seventh Precinct officers surrounded the house, cordoning off the block in the largely wooded area in a siege that lasted for hours. Heavily armed Emergency Services officers brought an armored vehicle to the scene.

Police said they found the wife bound but otherwise uninjured in the backseat of one of the couple’s cars, which was parked in the driveway of the modest two-story home.

Authorities said the intruders told her to lie on the backseat and be quiet. She didn’t know where the assailants went.

When police arrived, they thought the home invaders might still be in the house and summoned a hostage negotiator before approaching.

It was shortly after 11 a.m. that they discovered the female victim. Hours more passed before it was determined the assailants had left, police said.

Detectives say they believe the house was targeted, but that the victims did not know the perpetrators.

No arrests have been made. Authorities say the burglars took the woman’s diamond ring, the man’s necklace, two computers, cash and wallets.

Police said this is how the incident unfolded:

As the man opened his front door to go out about 9:05 a.m., the two masked men were waiting outside the door. They pushed their way in. The victim struggled with them briefly, but the home invaders overpowered him and bound the man and his wife, also blindfolding them with tape.

At first, the couple was held in their kitchen. Then one of the intruders took the wife to the couple’s bedroom and left her on the bed. After the men scooped up valuables around the house, they demanded more money at gunpoint. The husband persuaded them to let him go to the bank to get more money.

"I think the implication was it was going to be a significant amount of money," said Det. Sgt. John Best.

The wife believes her husband had left when the robbers put her, still bound, in the car – a disabled white Volvo station wagon that was one of many on the property. The husband has a car-scrapping business, police said.

Police said it was unclear why the robbers fled without waiting for the promised cash from the bank. The wife said she was removed from the bedroom 30 to 45 minutes after she was put there.

As the situation unfolded, Eastport Elementary School, a half-mile away, was placed on a modified lockdown Friday afternoon, school officials said. Students were released at their usual dismissal time.

Police blocked access to Union Avenue well into the evening as they continued to collect evidence at the house.

A neighbor, Pete Jespersen, witnessed at least part of the day’s events; he said he saw an officer approach the victims’ house with a drawn gun. He said police told him to leave his backyard and get inside.

At the Triangle Pub, a popular restaurant and bar a few blocks from the crime scene, the break-in was the topic of the night.

"This stuff never happens around here," said Brendan Neary of Eastport. "Everybody knows everybody."

The case was reminiscent, in some aspects, to a Connecticut home invasion that led to the murders of three members of the Petit family in Cheshire in July 2007. During the ordeal, Jennifer Hawke-Petit withdrew money from her bank to appease intruders who ended up killing her and her two daughters. Her husband, who was savagely beaten and bound at the onset of the incident, survived the attack.

"It freaked me out," said bartender Joanne Ziminski. "When I heard about it I thought it was like that situation in Connecticut. This is scary. It doesn’t happen here."